Cummings Fights Back; Playing Football Is Not Credential For Liberian Presidency

The Political Leader of the Alternative National Congress Alexander Cummings has termed as not constructive a commentary written against him on the Executive Mansion website.

In the commentary, Presidential Press Secretary Sam Mannah informed Mr
Cummings that running government is quite different from selling a bottles Coke.

But the ANC Leader reacted similarly that playing football is not also a credential for the Liberian Presidency, an apparent reference to President Weah.

Mr. Cummings, however, resisted expanding on the Executive Mansion’s criticisms against him, noting that it was not his nature to engage into vitriolic politics.

Commenting on the implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report, Mr. Cummings challenged the government to act on it.
He stressed that while it true that the country should foster reconciliation, those who committed atrocities should not go with impunity.

The ANC Leader then noted that Vice President Jewel Howard Taylor was ill-advised about comments to commissioners in Bong County.

According to him, it violates the Liberian constitution but such is unique to politics in the country.

Meanwhile, Deputy Information Minister Eugene Fahngon has descended on ANC Political Leader Alexander Cummings describing him as a man who does not have the competency to lead the country.

Deputy Minister Fahngon in a live Facebook video Wednesday said Mr. Cummings in the last few days has criticized the performance of the CDC led government headed by President George Weah.

The Deputy Information Minister noted that the failure of Alexander
Cummings to convince the people of Liberia led to his defeat in the 2017 Presidential and Legislative Elections.

He added that Liberia is not a corporate institution as believed by the ANC political leader. According to Minister Eugene Fahngon, President Weah has within the last five months done more exploits as compare to any sitting presidents of Liberia.

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