“President Weah’s Not Responsible For Economic Deficit In Liberia” – Clergyman Tells Citizens

The Pastor of the Holy Life Church in Gbarnga, Bong County says President George M. Weah is not responsible for the economic deficit Liberians are going through in Country.

It has been widely speculated in every quarter of the country that the economic hardship is being caused by President Weah Pro-Poor Agenda for Prosperity Development government in Liberia.

But contrary to the accusation, Pastor Daniel Porlonkollie, said every citizen in the country are the cause of the continuous problems on grounds that they have abandoned God and they are doing their own thing in the Country.

Additionally, the Clergyman said it is now time that citizens of the Country seek an audience with God, adding only God can solve the current economic hardship in Liberia.

The man of God told his congregation that protest will not solve the problems of Liberia, maintaining that it will just lead to another chaos in Country.

“We have protested in this Country, what is the cause? Why can we be satisfied with government? It is because we as citizens and government officials have not consulted God in the decision-making process of our Country,” Porlonkollie said.

The Holy Life Pastor caution citizens to remember the April 14, 1979, Rice Riot which was the proverbial straw that unleashed 14 years of violence, chaos, anarchy, death, and destruction in Liberia.

The clergyman told his congregation that Rice Riot was organized by the Progressive Alliance of Liberia (PAL), headed by the late political activist Gabriel Baccus Matthews against the backdrop of a proposed increase in the price of a 100lb bag of rice from $18to $22.

Sadly, a year later a bloody coup was staged by 17 noncommissioned officers of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) that led to the overthrow of the grand old True Whig Party (TWP) of the then Liberian government.

He informed his congregation that many opinions gathered from all sides of the Liberian political spectrum, including the young and older generations, pointed to the fact that change was inevitable in Liberia.

“Some of them argued that the change was not necessary through the barrel of a gun. Others warned that it was well known that people who seize power through gun violence would eventually turn dictators,” he stressed.

The demonstration signified, for the first time in many decades, that Liberians had seized the right to assemble and protest against the government.

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